Their Perspective

The other day I found something exciting while walking in the woods.

P1330299

One of our trees blew down many years ago.  This treasure-trove was easily visible inside.  I had to share it with my class.  I wondered what questions they might ask. “How did those get there?” “Who lives here?”  “Why are there so many?”  I imagined our next research project drifting into animals in winter or animal homes.

I forgot that children bring their own perspectives to all experiences.

Yes, they looked inside this log and said, “Hey, there’s coconuts in there!”  However, that was as far as their interest led them.  Instead, they were very concerned about the “mushrooms” growing on the outside of the log.

P1330309

They decided the log provided a great place for some large motor practice, climbing back an forth across the large tree.  A few investigated the jump-worthiness of the stump.P1330354As we were about to leave, without any interest in the stash of nuts, one of the children felt the tree had not been fully explored.  So he went in.

P1330362P1330383P1330409P1330412P1330422

Obviously, some things are much more interesting than talking about some old nuts.  Reminder to self: trust the children.  They will find what they need.

Forest 4s: The Real Woods

Getting Dirty

Gritty, dusty, grimy first-hand experience.  That is what defines our time outdoors.  As a few children searched for worms today, they had many variables to work with.

Which digging tool would produce the best worm hole?  Where would the worms most likely be hiding? What container would be most enticing to worm life?  How many rocks and pieces of mulch can we throw in the bucket, on top of a worm, before Mrs. Forst suggests we’re going to squish it?

It is so delightful to work with young children.  They experiment constantly, frequently making and adjusting mistakes, and only rarely throw in the towel.